Video game ‘exercise’ for an hour a day may enhance certain cognitive skills
Regular game play improves performance on tasks that use similar mental processes as video game
Playing video games for an hour each day can improve subsequent performance on cognitive tasks that use similar mental processes to those involved in the game, according to research published March 13 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Adam Chie-Ming Oei and Michael Donald Patterson of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
Non-gamer participants played five different games on their smartphones for an hour a day, five days of the week for one month. Each participant was assigned one game. Some played games like Bejeweled where participants matched three identical objects or an agent-based virtual life simulation like The Sims, while others played action games or had to find hidden objects, as in Hidden Expedition.
After this month of ‘training’, the researchers found that people who had played the action game had improved their capacity to track multiple objects in a short span of time, while hidden object, match three objects and spatial memory game players improved their performance on visual search tasks. Though previous studies have reported that action games can improve cognitive skills, the authors state that this is the first study that compared multiple video games in a single study and show that different skills can be improved by playing different games. They add that video games don’t appear to cause a general improvement in mental abilities. Rather like muscles that can be trained with repetitive actions, repeated use of certain cognitive processes in video games can improve performance on other tasks as well.

Video game ‘exercise’ for an hour a day may enhance certain cognitive skills

Regular game play improves performance on tasks that use similar mental processes as video game

Playing video games for an hour each day can improve subsequent performance on cognitive tasks that use similar mental processes to those involved in the game, according to research published March 13 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Adam Chie-Ming Oei and Michael Donald Patterson of Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.

Non-gamer participants played five different games on their smartphones for an hour a day, five days of the week for one month. Each participant was assigned one game. Some played games like Bejeweled where participants matched three identical objects or an agent-based virtual life simulation like The Sims, while others played action games or had to find hidden objects, as in Hidden Expedition.

After this month of ‘training’, the researchers found that people who had played the action game had improved their capacity to track multiple objects in a short span of time, while hidden object, match three objects and spatial memory game players improved their performance on visual search tasks. Though previous studies have reported that action games can improve cognitive skills, the authors state that this is the first study that compared multiple video games in a single study and show that different skills can be improved by playing different games. They add that video games don’t appear to cause a general improvement in mental abilities. Rather like muscles that can be trained with repetitive actions, repeated use of certain cognitive processes in video games can improve performance on other tasks as well.

(Source: sciencedaily.com)

  1. robosekkusu reblogged this from amayadoli
  2. amayadoli reblogged this from didyoudrinkmygingerale
  3. fractallogic reblogged this from didyoudrinkmygingerale
  4. didyoudrinkmygingerale reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  5. timberwolvesatnj reblogged this from biologylair
  6. drierthanthedesert reblogged this from everyday-tourist
  7. himedere-sakura reblogged this from everyday-tourist
  8. hangyaku reblogged this from everyday-tourist
  9. everyday-tourist reblogged this from biologylair
  10. perceptionsoftheworld reblogged this from psychologyresearch
  11. psychologyresearch reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  12. wwdbtses reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  13. slynkk reblogged this from biologylair
  14. ghsatz reblogged this from biologylair
  15. otokara reblogged this from biologylair
  16. sink-swim-surf reblogged this from internetr0yalty
  17. internetr0yalty reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  18. feedthejustin-13 reblogged this from biologylair
  19. caitie617 reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  20. its-all-about-psychology reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  21. robertdima reblogged this from biologylair
  22. unlistedkidnapper reblogged this from biologylair
  23. sporadic-randomness reblogged this from neuromorphogenesis
  24. aamarantine reblogged this from biologylair
  25. librock reblogged this from biologylair
  26. ekotata reblogged this from anrisalikespie
  27. anrisalikespie reblogged this from limelynn